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International symposium ‘Have We Become Too Ethical? – Managing vulnerability in human subject research

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The Centre for Bionetworking announces a one-day symposium, co-organised with Bob Simpson, Anthropology, University of Durham:

Have We Become Too Ethical? – Managing vulnerability in human subject research

The University of Sussex Conference Centre, Bramber House (Level 4), Refectory Road, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton

9th November 2015, 10:00 am – 5:15 pm  (Coffee and tea available from 9:30)

 

Over the last two decades ethical review by committee has become compulsory for all UK-funded research involving human subjects. It aims to prevent harm from biomedical research.

       Concern:  When is ethics review too constrictive and when too permissive?

       Aim:  To formulate the basis for feasible, fair and effective ethical review at home and
in transnational collaborative research

Well-known experts in the field of social-science research ethics and research funders will debate:

  • Contextual factors in ethical review
  • Competence of reviewers of human subject research
  • Informed consent

 

Speakers: 

Dr Ron Iphofen FAcSS, Independent Research Consultant
Context is (nearly) everything where ethical review is concerned
Adam Hedgecoe, Cardiff University
But we don’t inject green stuff: harm, risk and the organisation of ethics review
Peter Pels, Leiden University
The ethical consequences of management and joint ownership of ethnographic data
Priscilla Song, Washington University
Incommensurable Ethics: Ethnographic insights on negotiating human subject research between China and the US
Rachel Douglas-Jones, IT University of Copenhagen
From ‘Moral Force’ to ‘Research Integrity’: Building capacity in research ethics across Asia
Martin Tolich, University of Otago
On the trivialisation of Maori research ethics

Question Time panel with representatives from Association of Social Anthropologists (ASA), British Sociological Association (BSA), European Research Council (ERC), Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC), and Wellcome Trust

Organised by:
Margaret Sleeboom-Faulkner (m.sleeboom-faulkner@sussex.ac.uk), Department of Anthropology in Sussex and Bob Simpson (robert.simpson@durham.ac.uk), Department of Anthropology, Durham

 

Register now at: ethics-symposium-sussex.eventbrite.co.uk

Venue location

Poster 

Programme

 

For any enquiries please contact us on:

Tel: 01273 877449

Email: admin@centreforbionetworking.com